New York Times Articles From 1999 and 2003 Shed Light on Current Financial Crisis

Have you seen the New York Times article from 1999 giving warning about potential problems with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac? Agnieszka emailed the article to me and I did some checking with snopes and it turns out it is legit. The article is entitled “Fannie Mae eases credit to aid in mortgage lending.” Here are some telling quotes,

In a move that could help increase home ownership rates among minorities and low-income consumers, the Fannie Mae Corporation is easing the credit requirements on loans that it will purchase from banks and other lenders. The action…will encourage those banks to extend home mortgages to individuals whose credit is generally not good enough to qualify for conventional loans…Fannie Mae, the nation’s biggest underwriter of home mortgages, has been under increasing pressure from the Clinton Administration to expand mortgage loans among low and moderate income people and felt pressure from stock holders to maintain its phenomenal growth in profits.

In moving, even tentatively, into this new area of lending, Fannie Mae is taking on significantly more risk, which may not pose any difficulties during flush economic times. But the government-subsidized corporation may run into trouble in an economic downturn, prompting a government rescue similar to that of the savings and loan industry in the 1980’s. ”From the perspective of many people, including me, this is another thrift industry growing up around us,” said Peter Wallison a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. ”If they fail, the government will have to step up and bail them out the way it stepped up and bailed out the thrift industry.”

By expanding the type of loans that it will buy, Fannie Mae is hoping to spur banks to make more loans to people with less-than-stellar credit ratings.

Pretty chilling isn’t it?

Then you have another article from the New York Times from September 11, 2003 entitled “New Agency Proposed to Oversee Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae“. In this article Bush is calling for more regulations of Freddie and Fannie:

The Bush administration today recommended the most significant regulatory overhaul in the housing finance industry since the savings and loan crisis a decade ago. Under the plan, disclosed at a Congressional hearing today, a new agency would be created within the Treasury Department to assume supervision of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-sponsored companies that are the two largest players in the mortgage lending industry.

The plan is an acknowledgment by the administration that oversight of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac — which together have issued more than $1.5 trillion in outstanding debt — is broken. A report by outside investigators in July concluded that Freddie Mac manipulated its accounting to mislead investors, and critics have said Fannie Mae does not adequately hedge against rising interest rates.

Significant details must still be worked out before Congress can approve a bill. Among the groups denouncing the proposal today were the National Association of Home Builders and Congressional Democrats who fear that tighter regulation of the companies could sharply reduce their commitment to financing low-income and affordable housing.

”These two entities — Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac — are not facing any kind of financial crisis,” said Representative Barney Frank of Massachusetts, the ranking Democrat on the Financial Services Committee. ”The more people exaggerate these problems, the more pressure there is on these companies, the less we will see in terms of affordable housing.”

Fannie and Freddie were open to the changes and regulation. Congress was not. Should have listened to Bush and even Freddie and Fannie themselves.

0 Responses to New York Times Articles From 1999 and 2003 Shed Light on Current Financial Crisis

  1. Brian says:

    there is also a youtube of leading dems calling it a witch hunt that some repubs wanted regulations for fannie and freddie,
    it was a long video, but interestin

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