Category Archives: New Testament

What is the “Perfect” in 1 Corinthians 13? It Has Nothing to do with the Completion of the Bible

For we know in part, and we prophesy in part.
But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away.
1 Corinthians 13:9-10 (KJV)

For as far back as I can remember the popular interpretation of this verse was that the perfect was the completed New Testament. The idea is what once the Bible was completed there wouldn’t be any more need for the miraculous gifts of the Spirit to inform Christians but that everything that was needed would be and could be found in the Bible itself, which is the Holy Spirit inspired Word of God. This was part of our cessationist interpretation, that the Holy Spirit had gone into at least partial if not full on retirement and had nothing left to say directly to us today.

Whether or not that conclusion is a valid conclusion is another matter but is that the best interpretation of this verse? Is this reading the conclusion we want that we then reach back into the text to “find”? You probably already know how I am going to answer those two questions: No and yes.

I believe it was our polemic against other groups to find verses that seemed to prove that they were wrong and we were right. We needed a verse that seemed to say the work and gifts of the Spirit came to an end and this was our verse. To be fair the context does talk about the cessation of miraculous gifts like tongues and prophesy so those who went this route didn’t entirely miss Paul’s point but is this the best interpretation of theses verses as we have them in context?

If you bounced this view (perfect = complete New Testament) off Paul I believe it would leave him dumbfounded. Here is why and we go back to solid principles of biblical interpretation including context and the original language.

The word the KJV, ASV and the NASB translate “perfect” is translated other ways in other translations including “completeness” (NIV & NRSV). Which translation is more accurate? Before I answer that I want to point to something else that is worth considering. This same word is used in the very next chapter and is used in a very similar way and that is in 14:20 but is translated entirely differently even by the KJV itself and even the NASB that prides itself on consistent translation of words from Greek to English.

Here is the KJV on that verse,

Brethren, be not children in understanding: howbeit in malice be ye children, but in understanding be men.

How do we go from “perfection” to “men”? The word itself, teleios, means “meeting the highest standard” (BDAG) or “being mature”. What does that have to do with the completion of the New Testament? Absolutely nothing. There is more. Look at the contexts of the two uses,

1 Corinthians 14:18-20
“I thank God that I speak in tongues more than all of you. But in the church I would rather speak five intelligible words to instruct others than ten thousand words in a tongue. Brothers and sisters, stop thinking like children. In regard to evil be infants, but in your thinking be adults.” – 14:18-20

1 Corinthians 13:8-11
“Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away.  For we know in part and we prophesy in part, but when completeness comes, what is in part disappears. When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put the ways of childhood behind me.

The contexts are extremely similar. Paul is making a continuous point and it has nothing to do with the completion of the Bible. It has to do with growing into maturity in our thinking and in the ways we view each other and use our gifts in non-competitive ways. The gifts don’t make one more complete or teleios than another person. It is our attitude about the gifts, putting them in perspective that they aren’t eternal, that shows our “teleiosness”.

There is one last point. Let’s say you believe the perfect is the completed Bible, then where does that leave you with what Paul wrote? Not only do the gifts pass away at the completion of the Bible but so does knowledge and none of us would say knowledge passed away when the Bible was completed,

Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away.  For we know in part and we prophesy in part, but when completeness comes, what is in part disappears.”

Let’s keep Paul in context. That means we are left with more mystery surrounding the Spirit. That isn’t a bad thing. God himself is mysterious (Romans 11:33-36) and that never seemed to bother anyone or make us the least uncomfortable accepting God the Father’s work based on our lack of absolute knowledge in regard to HOW God operates today.

I believe the Spirit interacts with us today. I believe the Spirit isn’t mute but the Spirit communicates with us and we need to open ourselves up to that reality. I cannot give you a treatise on the mechanisms (how) the Spirit does what the Spirit does (John 3:8) but I know the Spirit is alive, well and active in our lives today.

Finding the Thread – Listening in John 9-11

In John 9 Jesus heals a man who was born blind…on the Sabbath (9:14). This got the attention of the local authorities who began to question the healed man. After verbally assaulting him the man defends Jesus saying, “We know that God does not listen to sinners. He listens to the godly person who doesContinue Reading

Preaching Philippians – A Reflection

This Sunday I am wrapping up a sermon series on Philippians. Philippians has long been one of my favorite books of the New Testament but I had never preached through it before. There were a few things that stand out in retrospect. First is partnership. The word for this is koinonia, often translated “fellowship” butContinue Reading

Studying 1 Peter 5:1-14 Elders Shepherding the Flock

In the last chapter of First Peter, Peter spends some time writing to the elders in his audience. The first word in the chapter is missed in some translations including the NIV< NRSV and NKJV – “Therefore.” This reminds us that what Peter is about to write is connected with what he was just talkingContinue Reading

Study of 1 Peter 4:12-19

Right before Peter wraps up his letter he spends a little more time talking about what it means to suffer as a Christian. Suffering and hints of suffering are found throughout First Peter. This is one of those instances where he deals with it directly. When you choose to follow Jesus you are choosing aContinue Reading

Studying 1 Peter 4:1-11

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Studying 1 Peter 3:8-22 – Expect to Suffer

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Studying 1 Peter 3:7 – Instructions for Husbands

“Husbands, in the same way be considerate as you live with your wives, and treat them with respect as the weaker partner and as heirs with you of the gracious gift of life, so that nothing will hinder your prayers.” – 1 Peter 3:7 Peter says that the husbands are to “be considerate” of theirContinue Reading

Studying 1 Peter 3:1-6 Instructions to Wives

Peter has already started in on a section on how to live as a Christian alien and stranger in the world within the various roles one can occupy. The lens through which these relationships and roles are viewed is the lens of Jesus. He suffered for doing what was right and in doing so wonContinue Reading

Studying 1 Peter 2:18-25 – Instructions for Christian Slaves

One of Peter’s main points in the letter is that as a Christian you are an alien in the world and so here is how you are to live. He starts 1 Peter 2 talking about our identity in Christ and finishes chapter two and into three talking about specific roles the Christians in hisContinue Reading

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